A Parable

by

There is a lot to learn from warfare, especially if you consider the psychological aspects of it.

One thing that young children don’t understand is that war is scary business. Heck, even grown adults that should know better don’t get this. I can’t even say I fully understand what war is actually like, and I never intend to find out for myself the full extent of the horror.

But we can learn some powerful lessons from warfare.

One, that there are things in life that are absolutely terrifying, so terrifying that some people would rather die than face them. This is what the word “courage” and “bravery” are about, and using these terms outside the scope of warfare or life-and-death situations diminishes their true meaning.

Two, that by standing together in facing a common foe, we can not only find the courage, but inspire each other to courage. Even though one or two guys might run away, as long as a good number of others stand firm, the rest will stand firm as well.

Three, that there are two kinds of armies. One is run from the top-down. They fight out of fear or greed. The other army is made up of peasants protecting their homes and land and livelihoods. They fight out of desperation.

If the fearful or greedy fight and lose, they can go home and live their lives out in peace. If the peasants lose the fight, they have nothing left. For them, it is better to kill or be killed than to lose the battle.

This is what opponents of the Tea Party don’t really understand. To them, they mount their weapons and attack the Tea Party out of fear or greed. They either fall in line with their buddies so they don’t lose their social standing, or they see how their livelihoods are threatened, livelihoods that depend on the tax money flowing through the government’s hands to their pockets.

To the Tea Party people, they fight out of desperation. They’ve already tried everything. They’ve played the game the way it’s supposed to be played, only to find out that all that hard work they put in is actually being threatened.

To them, there is no losing. If the Tea Party cannot reign in government largess, then nothing can, and America is a lost cause. There is no country to flee to. We are at the top of that shining city on the hill, and if our lights go out, there is no other light to turn to.

The Tea Party message isn’t a message of fear or greed. It is not greedy to want to keep the fruits of your labor. The Tea Party is not afraid of their leaders and themselves.

Their lances are pointed at the progressives, the Chicago-type political machines that has taken control of everything in our country. We don’t fear them because we already understand them. See, light comprehends the darkness, and shines anyway. Darkness cannot understand light and flees away.

We are fighting an awful war. Every day there is a new enemy or a new strategy we must combat. It seems the full machine of both the progressives within the Republican Party and the entire Democratic Party are working to undermine the Tea Party movement. Both of them are desperate because both of them rely on us forking over 40% of everything we earn so that they can live fat and happy in DC.

But we don’t need new strategies or new leaders. We don’t even need leaders at all, except temporary, localized leaders.

Our strategy is simple: Vote the suckers out by speaking the truth. Turn to our founding principles of limited, small government and freedom for everyone. Run on a platform of lower taxes, lower spending, and less government, and govern as if it was our last term, because we certainly don’t want a career of it.

The message of the Tea Party is reverberating across party lines and reaching that great middle that every pundit says we have to soften our tone for. No, we don’t need to soften the tone. Government is the problem, the people are the solution, and we simply need to trust ourselves and not some pinheaded geek from Harvard to tell us how to live our lives.

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