Snow and Life and Thanksgiving

by

If you haven’t noticed, it snowed all over our region yesterday. Today, there is still snow on our roads and people are encouraged to stay home.

I’d like to do a simple thought experiment with you. What happens if the snow doesn’t come off the ground for three months? Some of us are used to living in places where it snows 3-6 months out of the year. Some of us aren’t.

Question: Do you sit at home and starve, hoping government will show up to feed you? Or do you take responsibility for your situation and begin thinking how you can put the resources you do have available to you to use to obtain the food, clothing, warmth, and other things you need?

If you want to live your life as a parasite, then please, sit at home and starve this winter. Aesop’s fable of the ant and the grasshopper applies here. If you don’t understand, then let me explain. In the summertime, the ants were busy gathering food, while the grasshopper made fun of them for working so hard. Food was, after all, plentiful. When winter came, the grasshopper starved, because he had no food stores, while the ants survived. Are you a grasshopper or an ant?

Do you think, that in your moment of need, caused by your own stupid decisions, that the ants owe you a free meal? If that were so, then there would be too many grasshoppers and not enough ants. Potentially, both ant and grasshopper would equally die of starvation. Who would benefit then? If it came down to choosing who should survive the winter freeze, you have to choose those who prepared for winter, meaning, as a matter of morality, the ants must let the grasshoppers starve. If not, then next winter, there will be neither ant nor grasshopper. This is the harsh reality of the real world.

If, however, you are human, and understand that no matter what position in life you are, you have something, something you can build on, and something you can share with your fellow man, then start thinking about how you can best provide for yourself and help those who truly need it around you. This is the American spirit that beats within you. It is how the pilgrims survived Plymouth Rock. Let me explain.

When the pilgrims arrived in late autumn, the ground was already barren. They survived as best they could on the ship in the bay. Half of them died from disease.

That next year, they all shared what they had and all threw in their labor into a common resource. As would be expected (by those who know human nature), there was not enough labor, and so when winter came around that year, many people starved.

Seeing the error of their ways, the next year they divided the land up to able-bodied men. They were told that whatever they raised was theirs. That autumn, they had so much food and wealth that they celebrated in a days-long celebration we now know as Thanksgiving.

When you take a man, and tell him, “Use whatever you have, but you keep what you make”, then you give him the recipe to economic success. If you take that man and temper his natural greed (which causes him to lay up in store) with reasonable charity, then you have the founding of something even greater.

The pilgrims weren’t greedy Wall Street capitalists, hell-bent on turning a profit by hook or crook. They were religious fanatics, devoted to Christ’s teaching to love one another. And love they did! However, each had their own food, land, supplies, and tools, but each would, out of their sense of love and duty share what they had with others who were in need.

Communists, socialists, liberals, and progressives don’t get that human nature doesn’t change. The same heart that beats in us beat in the hearts of the Romans, Chinese, and Pilgrims. We can either adapt our lifestyle to accommodate the failings of our human nature, by tempering it with true religion and see the economic bounty from such, or we can fall prey to our own devious natures and suffer the consequences.

This Thanksgiving, thank God that He has shown us who we truly are, and thank God that he allows us to live our life according to the dictates of our conscience. Thank Him especially for all the food and material wealth we have in our own lives, and thank Him by sharing with those in need.

Our economic success is forever tied to our religious devotion. If we lose ourselves in worshiping the God of our fathers, the God who gave man natural rights to life, liberty, and property, but demands obedience to his laws and service to fellow man, then we will continue to see economic success and liberty. If we instead worship a different God, or turn ourselves away from these vital principles altogether, we will should not be surprised to see ourselves in poverty.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: