Corporations ARE People

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I am mystified by this recent trend that pretends that corporations aren’t people. It’s well established, at least in legal and business circles, that corporations are people, and that’s the only way you can treat them properly.

I think this sentiment comes from both a misunderstanding of what corporations are and a misunderstanding of what natural rights people have.

I believe I, and every other sentient human being, is born with the God-given right to assemble and organize. If I want to form a group with officers to represent that group, and with assets and liabilities and other things that individuals in our society might have, then I am free to do so, because that’s my God-given right.

Those who argue that corporations are not people are really saying that people don’t have the right to organize and assemble, cannot appoint officers to represent their so-created organizations, and cannot pool their natural rights and resources for a common goal.

Which idea inspires freedom, liberty, and the civil society?

I’m ashamed I have to explain this. I can say, definitively, that what I know about corporations I did not learn in my state-run education. After all, one of the purposes of state-run education is not to produce independent, sovereign citizens of the greatest country on God’s green earth. It is, obviously, to produce happy little subjects that pay their taxes on time so that the people who feed at the trough of public money can make their tee-time. This is one of the reasons why I adamantly oppose state-run public education, the other being that it has been a colossal failure in even producing people who can pay their taxes!

What is a corporation? It is an organization, any organization, where people join together for some purpose. In so doing, they create an entity that represents them and their rights to do certain things, like own property, speak their mind, transact in a free economy, etc.

A corporation, almost by definition, is people. The corporation itself is merely the creation of a new body from the bodies of the people who formed it and own it. Read the founding documents, identify who currently owns the corporation, identify how decisions are made about how to execute on its rights and responsibilities, and you will see everything a living, breathing person is, at least in the law an in the economy.

Our Federal Government is a corporation, as well as all governments anywhere in the world. People joined together, sharing their natural rights to create an entity that can act with the power of those rights.

Churches and charities are corporations. They represent people forming organizations together for the specific purpose of worship or helping the poor and needy, or whatever purpose they imagine is worthy of exercising their natural liberties to support.

Of course, companies you deal with every day are corporations. If you want to have an organization that can transact billions of dollars of business every year, it can only come about if several thousand people pledge some of their time and resources to its operation.

I really can’t see any reason why anyone who understands what our natural rights are and what corporations really are could call it anything but a person. It is the most appropriate appellation.

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One Response to “Corporations ARE People”

  1. tensor Says:

    So, if you and your business associates meet, and discuss forming a corporation, and you say, “I don’t think this corporation serves our interests,” and they agree not to form the proposed corporation, does that make you an abortionist?

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